Advocacy

IIDA New England advocates for the legal recognition, support and protection of the Interior Design profession.

Interior Design legislation helps establish and maintain professional standards that protect the health, safety and welfare of the general public. IIDA firmly believes that legal recognition, achieved through licensing, registration, and certification brings uniformity to the profession, defines responsibility, and encourages excellence in the Interior Design industry.

Currently, Interior Designers who are trained and qualified to work in a code-impacted environment are restricted from practicing to their fullest abilities. As the only major, unlicensed participants in the construction industry, these Interior Designers lack the ability to independently stamp and submit their work for building permits as required by the building code.

Why License Interior Design?

…to provide accountability for consumers
…to enable Interior Designers to act as primary contractors on jobs and eliminate the need to pay architects or engineers to redraw, stamp and sign their work.
…to encourage economic development by allowing a greater number of businesses to compete for commercial design work.


How does legal recognition protect the public?

It will safeguard the public by creating accountability. Consumers will know they’re working with qualified, responsible professionals utilizing the latest information regarding health, safety, and welfare and who have met specific, nationally accepted standards of minimum competency, including education (university and continuing education), experience and examination (NCIDQ)It will safeguard the public by creating accountability. Consumers will know they’re working with qualified, responsible professionals utilizing the latest information regarding health, safety, and welfare and who have met specific, nationally accepted standards of minimum competency, including education (university and continuing education), experience and examination (NCIDQ).


Would regulation within the profession put non-registered designers out of business?

No. Registration would be optional for those who wish to work on qualified projects. For those who want to continue practicing within the guidelines of the current legislation there would be no change.


Would legal recognition of Interior Design create unnecessary regulation?

No. The registration of Interior Designers does not create any new regulation. It would allow qualified professionals to increase their scope of practice and work within an already heavily regulated industry.

Be your own advocate. Contact your local legislators directly, via letter writing or in person. If you are not sure who your local legislators are click here to find out. For ideas of what to write and say, download a Sample Support Letter or visit Tips for Talking to a Lawmaker.

Join other Local Leaders. Throughout New England there are already several groups engaging legislators. Contact them for state specific initiatives and ways to get involved.

Massachusetts Advocacy Council

Connecticut Coalition of Interior Designers

Maine Interior Design Association

Part of being an advocate is knowing your local legislation.

Massachusetts House Bill 2826 and Senate Bill 132
Maine Title 32
Connecticut Chapter 396a

When speaking with legislators and the community-at-large be able to explain industry specific concepts.

What is Interior Design

Who are Interior Designers and what do they do

What are differences between Interior Design and Interior Decorating

ADVOCACY BILLS REACH THE STATE HOUSE: SHOW YOUR SUPPORT!

The ball is rolling! IIDA New England and ASID New England have been working with Representative Elizabeth Poirier and Senator Barbara L’Italien on House Bill 2826 and Senate Bill 132, “An Act Relative to Advancing the Profession of Interior Design,” which would create an optional route to state registration of for interior designers.

More specifically, the bill would (a) ensure those working in the profession of interior design are treated equally and fairly, (b) generate small business growth, and (c) entice recent graduates to remain in the Commonwealth to utilize their skills and put their degree to use.

We are pleased to tell you that our message has resonated very well with members of the Legislature. To continue the momentum of support, we need you to contact the Joint Committee on Consumer Protection and Professional Licensure.

For additional information READ our letter to our members

New NCIDQ Practicum Exam Format

In just a few days, on April 1st, the last paper-and-pencil NCIDQ exam is being administered. This Fall, the exam will transition to ‘PRAC 2.0’ and will mark the first time the Practicum portion of the exam series will be administered on a computer. This change comes as a result of a study CIDQ (Council for Interior Design Qualification) produces every 5-years that analyzes the practice of interior design. Their latest research shows that technology has become integral to the daily roles and responsibilities of interior designers. CIDQ’s decision to transition to computer aided drafting for the Practicum Exam comes as a means to reflect this current work environment.

PRAC 2.0 will now be given at Prometric testing centers, just as the IDFX and IDPX are currently administered. The exam will utilize the same software as the Architectural Registration exam (ARE) version 5.0. ¹

What is the value of certification?

The NCIDQ exam certification allows interior designers to prove their expertise and understanding in current codes and protection in health, safety and welfare. In order to achieve NCIDQ certification, the candidates must pass all three sections of the rigorous NCIDQ exam: the practicum, IDFX and IDPX. “The strenuous requirements of the NCIDQ Examination give clients and employers added confidence in the caliber of work from NCIDQ Certified designers.” ²  

There are currently over 30,000 NCIDQ certified interior designers.

1. QPRACTICE -PRAC 2.0: Computer NCIDQ Practicum Coming in 2017 

2. Q Connection – First Quarter Newsletter

3. “Computerizing the NCIDQ Examination” – Multibriefs